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    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

    back to top

    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

    back to top

    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

    back to top

    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

    back to top

    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

    back to top

    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

    back to top

    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

    back to top

    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

    back to top

    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

    back to top

    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

    back to top

    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

    back to top

    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

    back to top

    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

    back to top

    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

    back to top

    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

    back to top

    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

    back to top

    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

    back to top

    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

    back to top

    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

    back to top

    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

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    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

    back to top

    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

    back to top

    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

    back to top

    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

    back to top

    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

    back to top

    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

    back to top

    MORE ABOUT SELECTING WETSUITS

    How thick should my wetsuit be?
    The main criteria, the neoprene thickness of the steamer that you will need, will depend on the water temperature in your area and how susceptible you are to the cold. For temperate waters, 3- 5mm steamer wetsuits will suffice, while in colder waters a 6-7 mm steamer wetsuit or even a (semi-)dry suit are sometimes recommended. Take into account that even in tropical waters you can get cold on a scuba dive that takes longer than 30 minutes and if you do, a steamer is a better choice than a shortie even though it is hot on land.

    If you see 7-5-3 wetsuits it means that this wetsuit has: a 7mm body, is 5 mm in the arms and legs, and 3mm in the seals at the arms, ankles and neck. This makes these scuba diving wetsuits easier to get in and out of, without losing much of the insulation a 7mm gives.

    Which stitching to choose?

    The quality of stitches on seams of scuba diving wetsuit and in particular steamers varies quite a bit.

    In ascending order of quality:

    1.    glued stitch (cheapest option);
    2.    over-locked stitch (better, but can be uncomfortable and let water seep in);
    3.    flatlock stitch (flat overlapping neoprene, which is comfortable  & affordable) and;
    4.    the blind stitch (interlocked: no piercing, so no leaking, but expensive).

    TIP Taped seams help prevent water leaking through with any of these types of stitching, so look out for steamers with those!

     

    Check out our full range of steamers here 

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